The future of advertising: The role of heavyweight interaction.

I missed one thing in my last post – there is a role for heavyweight interaction in the future of advertising but it is very specific.

Think back to how relationships form: through many, lightweight interactions over time. However, once that relationship has formed, and people are deeply committed on an emotional level, heavyweight interaction has a place. Although the vast majority of our interaction is lightweight, we will sometimes do heavyweight things for people we love and trust. We will go the extra mile. The same is true for brands. Once you have built a deep emotional relationship over many, lightweight interactions, you can introduce something heavyweight. For example, you can ask true fans of your brand to tell their friends about your new product. Or you can organize something  knowing that true fans will rally behind you and bring in their friends.

So the advertising strategy of the future: The majority of effort and spend will be supporting an always-on strategy based on many, lightweight interactions over time to build deep relationships and loyalty. A minority of effort and spend will be supporting a small number of heavyweight interactions with true fans to achieve specific goals (mostly around driving awareness of new things).

Thanks to @jpmaheu for stirring my imagination and memory regarding heavyweight interaction.

7 comments

  1. One of the things we have to keep in mind in the ‘interaction’ with a brand is that the relationship is really one-sided. There is no variation of intensity and it is more of a ‘repeat’ that users crave for. With friends and those within our immediate circle, there is resonance and character that grows over time. The relationships are mutually rewarding and enhanced by the interactions, since they are backed by shared experiences.
    It would really be very hard to find a brand interaction that equalled or rivalled a real-world relationship, unless the person is socially challenged to that extent. So I would think that the ‘heavyweight interactions’ are at best one step further than the lightweight interactions’ and not a huge difference. But building the web of ‘lightweight interactions’ is an absolutely amazing thought

  2. [...] Adams claims that to really reach today’s consumers, companies and brands will need to build relationships with them rather than simply grabbing their attention or utilizing disruptions as an advertising tool. In other words, marketers should be progressive rather than aggressive, adding a fifth “P” — Participation — to the traditional marketing mix of Product, Price, Place and Promotion. [...]

  3. [...] Adams, Facebook’s Global Brand Experience Manager and a former social researcher at Google, has an interesting way of looking at social media in the context of “the advertising strategy of the future:” “The [...]

  4. [...] Adams claims that to really reach today’s consumers, companies and brands will need to build relationships with them rather than simply grabbing their attention or utilizing disruptions as an advertising tool. In other words, marketers should be progressive rather than aggressive, adding a fifth “P” — Participation — to the traditional marketing mix of Product, Price, Place and Promotion. [...]

  5. The question is how true fans introduce the brand and its products to the friends.

    If you love & trust your friends, do you like the brands they love and trust them as well, yes maybe.

    Yes this can be true if “true fans” activities are blended with a message about the brand so brand activity that’s actually generating interest to the friends won’t get buried.

    The best brands have to reach into the hearts to let show respect, recognition, trust and a positive relationship.

    The messages have to evoke positive emotions about the products or services and be able to connect with the new customers

  6. [...] P. 2012. The future of advertising: The role of heavyweight interaction. Available from: http://www.thinkoutsidein.com/blog/2012/03/the-role-of-heavyweight-interaction/ [Accessed 13 march 2012]. Share [...]

  7. http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/05/three_myths_about_customer_eng.html?awid=7522500155188580464-3271

    I felt like many of the claims in the above article contradict many of your findings. Seems like the study that the article refers to may be flawed. Was curious to hear your thoughts on it.